Update 7/15/2020: Due to new developments with the show, the premiere has been paused. This is a good thing, trust me. I will update you all very soon... - Rissi


2020 marks fifty years since the debut album of Linda Martell, the first black woman to play the Grand Ole Opry and to chart a song on the Billboard Country Chart. Her album, Color Me Country, was the foundation on which I, and everyone after her, have built a career. It’s kind of crazy to think that after all these years, we are still asking where the black presence in Country music is and more baffling, where are the black and brown female stars? In 2018, after reading several incomplete lists in magazines and blogs, I set out to create a complete list of Black and Brown female country artists. The more I researched, the more I knew these stories had to be told. This pushed me to create this podcast, Color Me Country, named affectionately after Linda’s landmark album. 

Color Me Country is a conversation between myself and various black and brown women in Country/Americana/Roots music, all considered to be “white” genres. It is my hope to tell and preserve our unique stories and show that not only do we exist, but we are thriving outside of the mainstream and are very much a part of the fabric and history. I tell these stories as an example of how multi-faceted and versatile WE are. The episodes will run approximately 45mins to an hour in length, and the first season will feature one episode every week for 10 weeks. My guests include Mickey Guyton, Miko Marks, Tierra, Tristan McIntosh, Crystal Shawanda, Chaley Rose, Lizzie No, Kamara Thomas and more. We have honest discussions about race, music industry politics, backstories, and life.  This endeavor is my love letter to Linda Martell, Ruby Falls, Dona Mason, Barbara Cooper, Virginia Kirby, and every woman whose names we’ll never know who made it possible for me to step on that Opry stage in 2008. To every black or brown girl that ever had a dream, only to be told they can’t or shouldn’t aspire to it simply because of the color of their skin. Your dreams, no matter how out of the box, are valid. I am SO excited to get this out into the world. Go to www.colormecountry.com for more details...

Update 7/15/2020: Due to new developments with the show, the premiere has been paused. This is a good thing, trust me. I will update you all very soon... - Rissi

2020 marks fifty years since the debut album of Linda Martell, the first black woman to play the Grand Ole Opry and to chart a song on the Billboard Country Chart. Her album, Color Me Country, was the foundation on which I, and everyone after her, have built a career. It’s kind of crazy to think that after all these years, we are still asking where the black presence in Country music is and more baffling, where are the black and brown female stars? In 2018, after reading several incomplete lists in magazines and blogs, I set out to create a complete list of Black and Brown female country artists. The more I researched, the more I knew these stories had to be told. This pushed me to create this podcast, Color Me Country, named affectionately after Linda’s landmark album.

Color Me Country is a conversation between myself and various black and brown women in Country/Americana/Roots music, all considered to be “white” genres. It is my hope to tell and preserve our unique stories and show that not only do we exist, but we are thriving outside of the mainstream and are very much a part of the fabric and history. I tell these stories as an example of how multi-faceted and versatile WE are. The episodes will run approximately 45mins to an hour in length, and the first season will feature one episode every week for 10 weeks. My guests include Mickey Guyton, Miko Marks, Tierra, Tristan McIntosh, Crystal Shawanda, Chaley Rose, Lizzie No, Kamara Thomas and more. We have honest discussions about race, music industry politics, backstories, and life. This endeavor is my love letter to Linda Martell, Ruby Falls, Dona Mason, Barbara Cooper, Virginia Kirby, and every woman whose names we’ll never know who made it possible for me to step on that Opry stage in 2008. To every black or brown girl that ever had a dream, only to be told they can’t or shouldn’t aspire to it simply because of the color of their skin. Your dreams, no matter how out of the box, are valid. I am SO excited to get this out into the world. Go to www.colormecountry.com for more details...